The York Astronomical Society

The York Astronomical Society was founded in 1972, around about the time that Apollo 16 went to the Moon. We were set up to demonstrate and teach astronomy and spaceflight to the people of York and the surrounding areas. The society currently has over 100 members.

We are a lively group, with members of all ages and abilities. The society meets twice a month when we have talks, slide shows and practical demonstrations and observing sessions. The society owns an array of telescopes which are used on meeting nights and at public star parties.

We also operate an observatory with mutliple telescopes and a warm room on the outskirts of York for the use of its members.

For details of our next meeting, please click on the events page, or like us on Facebook.

Meeting #930. Friday 15th May. 8pm in the main hall of the Priory Street Centre.

"Sir Joseph Banks and the Transit of Venus" by Paul Money.

Members: £1 on the door
Non-members: £2.50
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2 weeks ago

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We had a great meeting last night. Another York AS informal. Although the majority of the members who presented spoke about the same subject (i.e. the recent solar eclipse) it was nice to see so many different points of view and techniques being used. Many thanks to everyone who stood up to talk for a few minutes.

Afterwards we had a well attended session at the observatory under clear skies, where a shadow transit across Jupiter was the star of the show.
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1 month ago

On Friday April 17th we have an informal evening where members (or non members) are invited to step up and show what they have been doing recently.

On this particular evening we will be concentrating mainly on the recent solar eclipse so if you have any photos or a tale to tell about your eclipse experience, please let the committee know on info@yorkastro.org.uk or in the comments below and we'll book you in!

Thanks.
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2 months ago

41 years ago today, Mariner 10 became the first spacecraft to flyby the planet Mercury. The initial flyby was 437 miles above the planet.

Mariner 10 was the first spacecraft to make use of an interplanetary gravitational slingshot maneuver, using Venus to bend its flight path and bring its perihelion down to the level of Mercury's orbit.

This maneuver, inspired by the orbital mechanics calculations of the Italian scientist Giuseppe Colombo, put the spacecraft into an orbit that repeatedly brought it back to Mercury.

Mariner 10 used the solar radiation pressure on its solar panels and its high-gain antenna as a means of attitude control during flight, the first spacecraft to use active solar pressure control.

The Mariner 10 spacecraft was manufactured by Boeing.

Source: Wikipedia - en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariner_10
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2 months ago

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